The Color/Effect Iterations

The Bottles

Red Bottle #1 (first iteration, shown on far left): Pantone 491C was used as a color starting point. For the bottle, the color was created using a combination of red, brown and black pigments to create a red-shaded brown that was used in the base layer. In the surface layer, a small amount of red pearl was added to heighten gloss and reflectivity. Although the color matched the initial reference (the shoes), this bottle was deemed “too brown.”

Red Bottle #2: The level of red was increased and the level of brown used in both layers was decreased, while keeping the black loading the same as #1. The amount of red pearl in the surface layer was increased by a factor of 2.5. This bottle was “better, but still too brown.”

Red Bottle #3: The level of red was increased by 40%, and brown was reduced by 50%, while keeping the black loading the same. This color was again used in both layers, and the red pearl in the surface layer was increased by a factor of 4.5 over #2. This bottle was “really getting there.”

Red Bottle #4: Technicians switched to a different red (a blue-shade red) in both layers, and brown was eliminated completely while the black and the pearl loading remained the same.

Red Bottle #5: The only difference in this bottle versus #4 was a switch to a different, high-intensity red pearl. The result was “very good just a bit too yellow.” Red Bottle #6: Blue was added to the formulation used in #5, which decreased the yellow and made the whole effect deeper and richer. This was the final formulation chosen for the shampoo bottle.

Pink Bottle #1: (not pictured) Pantone 493C was used as a color reference. The outer layer combined white and red with a silver pearl, while the base layer used the same white and red but no silver. Color loading in the base was higher overall in order to mask the shade variation of the postconsumer resin. This effect was “nice, but a bit dull.”

Pink Bottle #2: (not pictured) The formulation of the outer layer was changed to reduce white by one-third and reduce the red by 10%. A white pearl was added—along with a small amount of red-copper pearl to tone the flash (the light reflected off the bottle) toward pink and to warm the color. The inner layer remained the same. Ddecreasing the color loading in the surface layer had the effect of moving pigment out of the outer layer so that the color strength comes out of the inner layer. More clarity in the surface layer allowed light to work with the pearl much better. This was the final formulation chosen for the conditioner bottle.

The Caps

Brown Cap #1: Pantone 4975 was used as the reference color. The ratio of brown to black was 5:1 and no pearl was used.

Brown Cap #2: The ratio of brown to black was reduced to 3.5:1 to create a darker brown. No pearl was used.

Brown Cap #3: The ratio of brown to black was reduced to 2.15:1 to go darker still. Again, no pearl was used.

All of these test caps were dark black/brown and totally opaque. Next, a series was made to create caps that were “more” red.

Variation Cap #4: The same color combination as the outer layer of Red Bottle #2 (developed from Pantone 491C plus higher levels of red, lower levels of brown with added red pearl) was used.

Variation Cap #5: Loading of all color and pearl was reduced 20% to allow for greater translucence.

Variation Cap # 6: (not pictured) This iteration has 25% less pearl than in #5, with the addition of the blue shade red that was used in Red Bottle #4.

Variation Cap # 7: Increasingly red, this cap had 33% more of the blue-shade red, along with magenta. Pearl was reduced 33% compared to the levels in Variation Cap #6. The result was a translucent red.