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The Science of Innovation

By: Alexandra Voigt
Posted: June 5, 2009, from the June 2009 issue of GCI Magazine.

Living Proof’s debut product line evolved out of the discovery of the polyfluoroester molecule, which adheres tightly to the hair to provide longer-lasting moisture resistance and rebalancing of the hair fiber’s interaction with the atmosphere, even after extreme humidity.

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No Frizz evolved out of the discovery of the polyfluoroester molecule by Langer and his team. The molecule, smaller than materials traditionally used for frizz control, adheres tightly to the hair to provide longer-lasting moisture resistance and rebalancing of the hair fiber’s interaction with the atmosphere, even after extreme humidity.

Living Proof’s introduction to the marketplace gained early momentum by winning Allure magazine’s 2008 Best of Beauty Award for the technology behind the No Frizz line, in addition to positive press in other consumer beauty magazines and beauty blogs. “Beauty editors and editors at large are huge fans of the product, and they started telling each other about it,” says Robillard. “The other thing that was helpful was that bloggers started carrying the message far and wide. Even before the product hit, bloggers and communities of women who tried the product started creating fan sites for the brand.” In addition to the buzz surrounding the product, Robillard credits a combination of high touch public relations efforts with a modern mix of retailers to carry the products.

“There’s been a lot more product outreach than I’ve ever done before, because we know we have a product that people will love,” says Robillard. “We wanted to work with QVC and Sephora because they are both successful, growing retailers. Company size is also important, because when you’re creating a new molecule like we did, we needed to go to channels where we were able to reach a lot of people. It was very important to launch to a broad audience.”

Part of that broad audience includes scientists both within and outside of the beauty industry, and reaching them with the company’s own scientists.

“The scientists [Langer et al.] are actively involved in the press,” says Robillard. “We do try to play up the science behind [the product line] and keeping the balance of information is important.”