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Ingredient Innovations Fuel Hair Care

Posted: August 13, 2013

According to Euromonitor International, hair care reached a total value of $75 billion in 2012, mainly due to ingredient and product innovations in the category. Ingredient innovations include scalp-treating ingredients found in skin care, anti-aging properties, and multi-step solutions beyond conditioner and shampoo. Product launches include hair serums, pre-treatment masks and pre-shampoo oils. In a video post, Euromonitor’s beauty and personal care analyst Nicole Tyrimou and ingredients analyst Anais Mirval discuss the possibilities for category reinvention these hair care innovations hold.

Tyrimou says, “While skin care reached the highest incremental value in 2012, hair care was a close second, increasing its value by $4 billion, closing the gap with skin care and reaching $75 billion globally. The high upsurge was due to a revival in innovation in hair care, and one of the main reasons for it was inspiration from a close alignment with skin care. This was done through incorporating skin care ingredients, targeting the scalp, anti-aging claims in hair care products, as well as promoting a more multi step routine in hair care. The usual, two-step routine of shampoo and conditioner is now becoming obsolete, with many consumers hunting for three or four steps, which includes a hair mask treatment or oil. New product launches have included hair serums, pre-treatment masks, pre-shampoo oils, and even specialized treatments, among others.

“This marks a shift in consumers’ attitudes, especially in developed markets, which have been struggling. And consumers have been trying to find new ways to prolong time between salons visits by repairing and nourishing their hair. This multi step routine has been promoted two main ways in hair care—that’s through scalp treatments on one hand, and anti-aging on the other,” Tyrimou concludes.

Mirval says, “The same ingredients used in skin care can improve scalp condition. Scalp treatments should [offer] cleansing, stimulating and regeneration. This can be achieved by stimulating mitochondria, supporting keratins and fighting free radicals. In order to support the development of scalp treatments, the demand for the following ingredients is expected to rise—proteins and emollients, which provide nutrition and repair the scalp; also antioxidants such as vitamin C and vitamin E, which bring protection.

“There are opportunities for even further specialization by treating different scalp conditions, like [an] oily or dry scalp. This type of scalp treatment will expand the market for salyclic acid over natural antibacterials like tea tree oils or rosemary extract. Thus, the global market for salicylic acid is set to grow by 16 tonnes between 2012 and 2016 in hair care. Anti dry scalp treatment would create opportunities for plant oils and anti-emollients. The global market for plant oils is set to grow by 175 tonnes between 2012 and 2016 in hair care,” Mirval concludes.

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