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P&G Announces Plan to Use Innovative Sustainable Packaging

Posted: August 12, 2010

The Procter & Gamble Company announced plans to use renewable, sustainable, sugarcane-derived plastic on selected packaging on its Pantene Pro-V, Covergirl and Max Factor brands.

Sugarcane-derived plastic is a significant development in sustainable packaging because it is made from a renewable resource, unlike traditional plastic, which is made from non-renewable petroleum. The new material, according to the company, is made in an innovative process which transforms sugarcane into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic, a type commonly used for product packaging. It remains 100% recyclable in existing municipal recycling facilities.

"P&G's commitment to use renewable bio-derived plastic in its global beauty and grooming product packaging is an important step forward in its efforts to improve the environmental profile of its products," said Jason Clay, senior vice president of market transformation of World Wildlife Fund, U.S. "We applaud this announcement as part of their leadership in finding innovative solutions to the sustainability challenges facing the world today."

The company states that by launching this renewable packaging on some of its global beauty brands it will leverage its scale to deliver meaningful environmental improvements. P&G will source the sugarcane-derived plastic from Braskem SA, which manufactures the material using ethanol made from sustainably grown Brazilian sugarcane. The pilot will be rolled out globally over the next two years, with the first products expected to be on shelf in 2011.

''This innovation is truly consumer-driven. As we talk with women around the world, they tell us that they want to make themselves more beautiful without making their environment less beautiful,'' said Gina Drosos, group president, Global P&G Beauty. ''With this new packaging innovation, women can have confidence that their favorite brands are helping to make a difference.''