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Unilever Ads Subtract Sexist Stereotypes

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Unilever

Unilever has decided to take the advice of around 40% of women and change its advertising strategy. The company is calling on rivaling companies to follow suit and delete all sexist stereotypes from their advertisements.

Unilever is the second-biggest advertiser globally, spending $ 8,213,159,861 on advertising. The influence from its advertisements will aid in pushing the advertisement change “on a broader social level,” said Keith Weed, chief marketing officer.

While 90% of women feel presented as sex symbols in advertisements, only 3% of ads actually show women in a managerial or professional positions. Another 30% of women believe that the ads are based on the perceptions of men.

“If we looked at role, personality and appearance, then they weren't representing women as they are today,” said Weed. “Some of the imagery might have been current years ago, but it certainly wasn't today.”