gci

Is Equality Innovation?

Contact Author
Close
Fill out my online form.

"For a long time, countries across the region – and industries of all varieties – have been guilty of using out-dated gender stereotypes or objectifying women to sell products and services," the report noted.

Recently, Dove's #MyBeautyMySay campaign conducted research that found that about 70% of U.S. women "want to live in a world where women and girls are judged by what they do and say – and not on their looks alone."

Dove's recent focus on female equality and empowerment in US marketing is part of a larger global trend in beauty, according to a report from TrendWatching.

The consumer insights group argues that brands that focus on female empowerment can truly innovate their marketing. Which is why TrendWatching named SK-II among 10 brand groundbreakers In its Asian Innovation Frenzy list.

Avon introduced the Beleza Que Faz Sentido campaign, which focused on gender equality content and statistics.

SK-II introduced a campaign in China, which challenged stereotypes surrounding unmarried women, so called "leftover women." Via a short film, the luxury skin care brand "highlighted women who refuse to conform to social pressure, celebrating those who are independent, self-sufficient and proudly single." Appearing on a leading matchmaking forum in the country, the film garnered more than 11 million views.

Elsewhere, TrendWatching noted, a number of brands in Latin America have empraced marketing that highlights the humanity and ambitions of women.

"For a long time, countries across the region – and industries of all varieties – have been guilty of using out-dated gender stereotypes or objectifying women to sell products and services," the report noted.

For example, the Brazilian nail lacquer brand Risqué launched a line of products called Homens Que Amamos ("Men We Love") with names that touted positive male-female interactions such as "André fez o jantar" ("André cooked dinner") and Avon introduced the Beleza Que Faz Sentido campaign, which focused on gender equality content and statistics.

Avon also included the number for the Violence Report and Woman Service Center on its 180 makeup line. "The products were empty," TrendWatching noted, "a move intending to show that violence can’t be covered-up."

Finally, Sephora Brazil launched an 83-shade lipstick range that replaced the phrase "Women get dressed to please men" with "Do you think I got 83 lipsticks to please someone who doesn't know the difference between bordeaux and burgundy?"

Related Content