gci

Current cover

Green/Clean Beauty: What’s in a Name?

Contact Author Ajay Bam, Vyrill Inc.
Close
Fill out my online form.
woman trying on beauty products in front of computer

Tap Into Business Solutions! This is just part of the article. Want the complete story, plus a host of other brand-boosting articles to make your job easier? Sign up!

When it comes to the green beauty category, it’s all in the name. Marketers are well aware how new brand launches, coupled with strong consumer interest, have fueled hyper-growth within the category. Unfortunately, with such growth, consumers’ reference to the category is equally dynamic—to the dismay of marketers.

For example, is the category called “green beauty” or “organic beauty”? Perhaps “organic care” or “clean beauty” is preferred by consumers?

As marketers, we communicate our preference through key positioning messages presented via branded communication and marketing plans.

Want the rest of the story? Simply sign up. It’s easy. Plus, it only takes 1 minute and it’s free!

These bite-sized points are what we want the targeted consumer to hear, understand and remember when shopping within and speaking to others about the category.

However, the truth remains: consumer-to-consumer communication via user-generated video content (UGVC) is highly effective in driving trial and preference of any beauty category.

To that end, how are consumers referring to this rapidly evolving category via their videos? Luckily, we have the answer.

Vyrill (vyrill.com) specializes in analyzing data from UGVC, leveraging a proprietary AI platform to enable social commerce and product marketing.

In partnership with Global Cosmetic Industry, we reviewed 21,545 of authentic non-sponsored beauty videos on key social media channels to identify consumer preference, when referring to the “green beauty” category. The findings are summarized below:

  • The top 13 category terms were said collectively 47,704 times.
  • Notably, 13.56% of consumers preferred the current category term of “green beauty.”
  • More consumers now refer to the category as “clean beauty,” showing 14.88% of all mentions.
  • The term “organic” was often used interchangeably with “organic beauty.” To this end, “organic/“organic beauty” together equates to 15.02% of all category references. As with other “organic” products, as the category matures, it is highly possible this term will be used less by consumers.
  • Although “gluten-free beauty” was referred to 7,084 times (second highest of all category terms), 58.42% of all mentions were generated during Q1/Q2 of 2018, with a sharp, consistent reduction in Q3 and Q4 of 2018.

To conclude: based on the data, “green beauty” and “clean beauty” are maintaining growth and consistency among consumers.

Author bio:

Ajay Bam is the CEO and co-founder of Vyrill Inc. (vyrill.com).

Related Content